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PhD by haiku, vol. 4

Compiled by Patrick, Patrick and Louise.

The fourth and potentially final installation of our longest running series.

slide14

Buried in a grave
Sea of torrid rock and heat
Spawns a seed so deep
— Jess, experimental petrology

slide17

Flash rock plummets scorched earth
Oasis of questions
Frostily protected
— Liane, isotope geochemistry

Continue reading “PhD by haiku, vol. 4”

PhD by haiku, vol. 3

Compiled by Patrick, Patrick and Louise.

A continuation of a continuation of our PhD haiku’s.

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Such a mystery zircon
So obsessed with you
Let me know you more
— Bei, isotope geochemistry

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The sea-floor goes deep
Water is lost on the way
Looking for witness
— Laure, isotope geochemistry

Continue reading “PhD by haiku, vol. 3”

PhD by haiku, vol. 2

Compiled by Patrick, Patrick and Louise.

 

A continuation from last weeks blog post.

Suzette
Nitrogen, carbon
Noble gases and so on
Chemistry is key
— Suzette, isotope geochemistry

Louise

Two minerals paired
trap ancient information
of how they were made
— Louise, experimental petrology

Continue reading “PhD by haiku, vol. 2”

PhD by haiku, vol. I

Compiled by Patrick, Patrick and Louise

We asked members of the student body to summarise their research in the form of a haiku. Here is what they came up with…

tim-j

Dear sweet mantle plume
I really hope you exist
So much wasted time
— Tim, geodynamics

hannah

Where did people live?
Isotopes in teeth can help,
to stalk ancient folk
— Hannah, isotope geochemistry

Continue reading “PhD by haiku, vol. I”

Science inspired art: Haiku for progress

Art!? Haikus?! What does any of this have to do with a research blog? Everything. Scientific findings can be complicated, are often dripping with jargon, and easy to overlook or ignore. Science communication is most valuable when it is easy to understand. Enter watercolour and haiku.

Johnson Future

Gregory Johnson, an oceanographer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has distilled the entire International Panel on Climate Change 5th Assessment report  into 19 haikus with accompanying watercolour paintings and it is brilliant! Johnson has generated a disarming and inspiring account of the present state of our climate system. Using this creative path, he has made an otherwise daunting and dense scientific report (>2,000 pages long) into an intelligent and emotional piece of art.

Below is a slideshow of Johnson’s work.

Please visit Sightline Daily for the full article and links to pdf’s of these wonderful pieces.

I challenge you all to describe your research or profession with a simple haiku. Here is mine:

Ancient stalagmite

a window into the past

tell us your story

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